National Lutheran News

New Holden Village directors see opportunities in mine cleanup

The Holden Village board of directors has announced its selection of Chuck and Stephanie Carpenter as executive directors of the Washington state camp. The Carpenters will follow Paul and Carol Hinderlie and Tom Ahlstrom, who will complete their term in September 2010.

Holden Village overlooks a copper basin which will  require a major cleanup effort beginning in 2012 or 2013. Newly named  directors Chuck and Stephanie  Carpenter will oversee the reclamation project, which will not  require closing the village to guests.

Holden Village overlooks a copper basin which will require a major cleanup effort beginning in 2012 or 2013. Newly named directors Chuck and Stephanie Carpenter will oversee the reclamation project, which will not require closing the village to guests.

Chuck and Stephanie have worked with the current Holden Village staff team since 2005, and presently serve as operations manager and bookstore coordinator respectively. According to board president Chris Larson, they come with a broad array of gifts and experiences that have prepared them well to lead this ministry into a period of opportunity and challenge as the Village anticipates environmental cleanup of the adjacent copper mine.

“Contrary to rumor,” stated director Tom Ahlstrom, “the Village will not close during cleanup.” Rather, plans are underway to coordinate two summers of partial disruption (beginning in 2012 or 2013) with infrastructure work by Holden staff and volunteers. Meanwhile, village life and conversation will continue with programming on a smaller scale.

Holden Village is a Lutheran ministry that welcomes all people into the wilderness to be called, equipped, and sent by God. A former Cascade Mountain mining town given to three Lutheran church bodies in 1961, Holden Village has been a place of hospitality, renewal, and healing for nearly 50 years.

Holden is a real multigenerational village with a public school, its own hydroelectric plant, environmental projects, focused “garbology” practices, a pool hall and bowling alley, a craft center, general store — and an espresso stand. Fresh baked bread and healthy food nourish body and spirit.

Holden defines its community as “all who care for Holden with their labor, gifts, and prayers.” Perhaps the only “serious” organization listing hilarity as a core value, it is known for year-round programming that brings a distinguished assortment of presenters together for lively conversations and planning for ways to impact the spiritual and vocational life of all who are a part of the Holden community.

The new directors believe that as the wilderness itself is renewed, new possibilities abound.